Browsing All posts tagged under »end-of-life«

Dying Nurse Teaches Until the End

January 15, 2013 by

3

We were struck by a recent New York Times article about Martha Keochareon, a nurse dying from pancreatic cancer, who invited students from her alma mater to her bedside: For Ms. Keochareon, this was a chance to teach something about the profession she had found late and embraced — she became a nurse at 40, […]

The Corpse Leads, We Follow: Medical Intervention at the End of Life

January 10, 2013 by

1

Those of us who labor in the techno-confused trenches of American medicine need little reminder of how the profit driven machine seems to ramp up the closer a person is to death. We’ve counted the twenty drips hung around the patient in ICU Bed 2, glittering and glowing like the control panel of a jet […]

“We need to be as brave as our children.” An interview with Beecher Grogan

November 30, 2012 by

2

Beecher Grogan is the director of a nonprofit organization founded in 2006 by her daughter, Lucy Grogan. Lucy’s Love Bus delivers comfort to children with cancer through free integrative therapies such as acupuncture, massage, yoga, meditation and therapeutic horseback riding. Grogan is committed to healing the medical community and strives to educate physicians regarding the […]

“What about all the time before that?” an interview with Maria Meindl

October 15, 2012 by

1

Maria Meindl’s essays, poetry, and fiction have appeared in numerous journals. Her most recent book, Outside the Box details the life of her grandmother, writer Mona Gould, through documents left behind after her death. In Meindl’s essay “Rules,” she narrates the story of her mother’s time in a Jewish nursing home. In it, Meindl finds […]

“Embrace the tragedy.” An interview with Larry Cripe

October 12, 2012 by

0

Larry Cripe is a leukemia specialist who researches physician-patient communication and medical decision-making. He also writes for Grace Notes, a radio essay series. His essays have appeared in JAMA. In his essay, “The General,” Cripe remembers the difficulties he’s faced and the relationships he formed during his career as an oncologist. Interview conducted by Jasmine […]

End of Life Paperwork: Should you hire a consultant?

June 18, 2012 by

5

Jane Brody’s recent article on advanced healthcare directives in the New York Times gave voice to something I’ve been wondering for a long time. These forms have gotten increasingly complex over the years. I know because more and more friends, relatives and relatives of friends are sending them to me to review. Can anyone who is […]

Plan On a Messy Ending

June 10, 2012 by

0

As we all know, we can’t script the end of our lives, choose the time, date or even the disease that will kill us. What we can plan is how much medical intervention is heaved our way in the final days when our families are overcome by grief and possibly confusing and conflicting information. But […]

The Pros and Cons of Long-Term Care Insurance

May 14, 2012 by

0

Check out the WSJ article today on this very issue (“Should You Purchase Long-Term-Care Insurance?” 5/14/12). Interestingly, on the “nay” side is the long waiting period–exactly what happened to my father–and what I wrote about in “A Better Place.”

“Most nurses carry invisible wounds.” An interview with Patricia McCarthy

May 14, 2012 by

2

Patricia McCarthy is a registered nurse who resides with her husband and children in Chicago, Illinois.  In “Do You Remember?”—her first publication— McCarthy addresses the dying patients she consoled, entertained, and helplessly watched over, as well as those who suffered in spite of the overworked hospital staff’s best efforts. “I often cannot remember faces and […]

“In a strange way, Dad’s lingering illness was a gift to us both.” An interview with Sandell Morse.

May 9, 2012 by

2

Sandell Morse, a fellow at the Vermont Studio Colony and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, currently facilitates workshops for the Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance and for the New Hampshire Writers’ Project. Her work has appeared in many literary magazines and anthologies and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. In her essay […]