Browsing All posts tagged under »communicating with patients«

A Conversation with Ellen Goodman

January 8, 2013 by

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Ellen Goodman is a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and activist. After her mother’s death, Goodman, co-founded The Conversation Project—an organization “dedicated to helping people talk about their wishes for end-of-life care.” The Conversation Project recently launched a campaign to give the Gift of Conversation, where you can print or email an invitation to start end-of-life talks […]

“Embrace the tragedy.” An interview with Larry Cripe

October 12, 2012 by

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Larry Cripe is a leukemia specialist who researches physician-patient communication and medical decision-making. He also writes for Grace Notes, a radio essay series. His essays have appeared in JAMA. In his essay, “The General,” Cripe remembers the difficulties he’s faced and the relationships he formed during his career as an oncologist. Interview conducted by Jasmine […]

“Healthy, honest, and healing.” An interview with Joe Primo

May 30, 2012 by

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Joe Primo is the Associate Executive Director at the Good Grief Center for grieving children and teens in New Jersey and a board member of the National Alliance of Grieving Children. He earned his master’s of divinity degree at Yale University. Primo’s essay, “The Business of Grief,” which draws from his personal experiences as a […]

“The line between ‘extraordinary measures’ and ‘palliative care'”: An Interview with Laurie Foos

May 22, 2012 by

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Laurie Foos is the author of the novels In Utero, Portrait of the Walrus by a Young Artist, Twinship, Bingo Under the Crucifix, and Before Elvis There Was Nothing. She currently teaches at Lesley University and lives on Long Island. Foos’ essay, “On Bearing Witness,” recounts helping her father through his long illness and death. […]

“Fears, joys and struggles.” An Interview with Anne Jacobson

May 16, 2012 by

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Anne Jacobson is a family physician with a master’s in Public Health. Her work has appeared in JAMA. She lives with her husband and two children in Chicago. Her essay “To Morning” describes a difficult night late in her residency—three codes, three deaths: one young woman with a sudden illness, an older man with no […]

“Most nurses carry invisible wounds.” An interview with Patricia McCarthy

May 14, 2012 by

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Patricia McCarthy is a registered nurse who resides with her husband and children in Chicago, Illinois.  In “Do You Remember?”—her first publication— McCarthy addresses the dying patients she consoled, entertained, and helplessly watched over, as well as those who suffered in spite of the overworked hospital staff’s best efforts. “I often cannot remember faces and […]

“In a strange way, Dad’s lingering illness was a gift to us both.” An interview with Sandell Morse.

May 9, 2012 by

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Sandell Morse, a fellow at the Vermont Studio Colony and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, currently facilitates workshops for the Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance and for the New Hampshire Writers’ Project. Her work has appeared in many literary magazines and anthologies and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. In her essay […]